Ivy Tech Community College announces retirement of Anderson Chancellor Dr. James R. Willey  

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. – Ivy Tech Community College Anderson Campus Chancellor Dr. James R. Willey will retire on July 6, 2020. He has served in this role since 2017 and been with Ivy Tech since 2009. The College will begin a national search process in the coming months to fill the position.

Willey has held many leadership roles for the Anderson location including serving as vice chancellor/executive dean, campus president, and chancellor. The campus was originally part of the legacy East Central Region that included campuses in Muncie, Anderson, Marion, and New Castle. In 2017, Ivy Tech dissolved the regional structure and each campus location is now led by its own chancellor.

“I have been in education for 30 years, 11 at Ivy Tech, and held positions from teacher, to professor, to superintendent, to chancellor, and although I’m leaving Ivy Tech, my time serving the community and economic development for the City of Anderson and Madison County will continue,” said Willey. “Throughout my time in education, my greatest moments are always seeing students cross the stage. I look forward to the next chapter of my life where I can serve the community in new ways, but still be very involved and contribute to the areas’ economic health.”

Willey was instrumental in overseeing the construction of the new Anderson campus in 2015, an 85,000 square foot facility featuring state-of-the-art labs, data center, and collaborative space for faculty, staff, and students. During the campaign, more than six million dollars were raised from community gifts and in-kind donations, demonstrating the generosity and support the Madison County community has for its Anderson campus.

“I want to thank Chancellor Willey for his oversight and leadership of the Anderson Campus and his dedication to our students and their success. I wish him well in retirement from Ivy Tech and his efforts to serve his community in new ways,” said Ivy Tech President Sue Ellspermann. “Ivy Tech is integral to the success of Madison county and employers, especially during economic times like this. We will continue our commitment to serving students, employers, and the community.”

Willey’s career also includes: superintendent of the Alexandria Community School District, principal of the Wabash Middle School, and Junior/Senior High School principal at Daleville Community Schools. He was also a probation officer for the Grant County Superior Court III in Marion, and a police officer for the City of Gas City.

Willey earned his Doctor of Education with an Ed.D. in Educational Leadership & Administration, an Ed.S. in Educational Leadership & Administration, and a Masters of Arts in Education from Ball State University. He holds a Bachelor of Science in Political Science and Criminal Justice from Indiana Wesleyan University. He has also participated in numerous community, economic development, and non-profit organizations serving in board positions and advisory roles.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College serves communities across Indiana, providing world-class education and driving economic transformation. It is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering high-value degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its communities, along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

 

 

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50 W. FALL CREEK PKWY. NORTH DR.

INDIANAPOLIS, IN 46208

Ivy Tech is an accredited, equal opportunity, affirmative action community college.

Community colleges ready to serve as students rethink their options

By Dr. Sue Ellspermann, President, Ivy Tech Community College

According to a recent study by the Center for Consumer Insights, one of the ripple effects of the coronavirus pandemic is that an estimated 28 million Americans–or 11 percent of the U.S. adult population–are rethinking their education plans. This comes at a time when our nation is facing significant challenges in terms of its global competitiveness and when more jobs than ever require a postsecondary credential.

This raises concerns not only nationally, but locally as well. In Indiana, the percentage of adults who have earned at least an associate degree has long lagged behind the national average. In addition, even before COVID-19, we were not on track to achieve our statewide goal of 60 percent of the workforce earning a post-secondary degree or credential. The hard truth is, we can’t afford to fall even further behind.

At Ivy Tech Community College, we believe Indiana has a significant opportunity to buck the national trend–but we will need to think differently about higher education moving forward. Our recovery from the coronavirus pandemic could, in fact, prove to be a much-needed catalyst that mitigates long-standing challenges like the student debt crisis, misalignment between degree completion and employer needs, and antiquated delivery systems that limit opportunities for first generation students, minority families, and working adults.

Our staff and faculty are eager to play a key role in this evolution. As Indiana’s most affordable college, we’re local and ready to serve more students who need to cut their college costs by spending two years at Ivy Tech before transferring to a four-year institution. We’re here to accommodate guest students who may want to continue progressing towards their goals this summer or who aren’t quite ready to return to a four-year college campus in the fall. We have heard the term “gap year” used for students who are thinking of taking a year off before going back to, or starting at a four-year institution.  No one should be taking a gap year.  Instead the term “visiting year” might be used – the smarter choice is to visit Ivy Tech for a year taking classes and gaining credentials which stack to the student’s academic goal.

We’re ready and able to provide a high-quality education for those preparing to start their college journey and for those who are wondering what to do next with a journey they have already started. We’re ready to retrain those whose jobs have been impacted in recent weeks. And we’re ready to provide the short-term credentials employers value, which can also help the unemployed make a rapid return to the workforce.

In truth, Ivy Tech has always been ready to serve in these roles. Today, the only difference is that Indiana families also may be ready for a different approach to college. In the same study cited above, the percent of American adults considering a community college increased from 13 percent to 19 percent. Given the community college’s unique ability to meet the needs of those traditionally underserved by colleges and universities, this should be encouraging not only to Ivy Tech, but to all who value higher education.

These are unprecedented times, and they call for new approaches to just about everything we do. Higher education should be at the forefront of this reinvention with community colleges leading the way to a brighter future for Indiana, the nation, and our people.

President Ellspermann is Ivy Tech Community College’s ninth president and oversees the largest singly accredited statewide community college system in the nation. She has more than 30 years of experience in higher education, economic and workforce development, and public service.

Ivy Tech Community College Offering Free Personal Care Attendant Course

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. – Ivy Tech Community College is now offering a free Patient Care Attendant (PCA) course in response to the much-needed support of long-term care facilities in Indiana. Ivy Tech will provide the five-hour classroom portion of the PCA class virtually through Zoom, while the long-term care facilities will be responsible for three hours of skills training and check-offs on-site at the facility.

“Ivy Tech has a long-standing relationship with the long-term care providers in our state,” said Mary Anne Sloan, vice president of Healthcare, Ivy Tech Community College. “Our ability to offer this training at no cost to them is one way to assist in increasing the ability of long-term care facilities to provide safe and efficient care to some of our most vulnerable citizens. Our faculty are committed to providing this important training and are very excited for the opportunity.”

Upon completion, the eight-hour course will allow individuals to assist long-term care residents with basic needs such as feeding assistance, dressing, and more. Individuals must register through a long-term care facility to attend the training.

For more information contact Martha Moody at mmoody24@ivytech.edu.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College serves communities across Indiana, providing world-class education and driving economic transformation. It is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering high-value degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its communities, along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

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