Ivy Tech Community College to host high school machining competition

INDIANAPOLIS – High school students from across the state of Indiana will convene at Ivy Tech Community College this Saturday, January 19, to compete in the tenth annual Indiana High School Machining Competition.

The event will involve eight high schools and career centers from around the state, including the Richmond, Evansville, Columbus, Huntington and Indianapolis areas.  Sixteen contestants and eight instructors will also be meeting in a round-table discussion regarding manufacturing opportunities for students, including jobs, internships and training.

The event is hosted by the Indiana Chapter of the National Tool & Machining Association (INTMA).

“This competition represents some of the brightest young minds in the machining industry sector who have invested their high school years to become true professionals,” said Troy Nix, INTMA Executive Director.  “As one of the most high-tech industries in manufacturing, students involved in this machining competition will utilize cross functional skill sets and working knowledge of geometry, trigonometry, computer-aided design, and blue print reading to create metal fixtures and steel components to within hundredths of an inch in tolerance.”

During the competition, students from a variety of high school machining programs from around the state will be tested on a variety of areas ranging from the most basics of machining principles to creating devices on lathes, mills, and other equipment.

“This entire process and machining contest is about applying what students have learned from both their academic and machine trades curriculum over the last four years of high school,” said Dan Flick, Ivy Tech’s lead machine trades professor and education coordinator for the contest.  “Every student who competes in this competition has the ability, upon graduation, to obtain a position at one of hundreds of machining companies across the state or advance their education in two or four-year degree programs nationally.  As more and more manufacturing jobs transition back from overseas, the need for students entering into the machining field has never been greater.”

The winner, runner-up and third place finishers of the 2013 Indiana High School Machining Competition will receive cash prizes, scholarships, and special tool sets donated by machining companies, suppliers and the INTMA.

Saturday’s competition will take place at the Glick Family Technology Center on the campus of Ivy Tech Community College, 50 W. Fall Creek Pkwy. North Dr., Indianapolis.  The event begins at 8 a.m. and an awards ceremony will take place at 1 p.m.

About the INTMA
INTMA has been providing high-quality services to the Tooling and Machining Industry for the past several decades.  INTMA provides manufacturing executives with programs, business events, and networking opportunities to enhance operational success.  INTMA provides scholarships for the advancement of education in the machining sector and works to connect industry professionals, educators, students, and parents for long term success.

About Ivy Tech
Ivy Tech Community College is the state’s largest public post-secondary institution and the nation’s largest singly-accredited statewide community college system with more than 200,000 students enrolled annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

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