Ivy Tech Community College ranks 1st in fundraising nationally

Second year in a row Ivy Tech ranks at the top of the list

INDIANAPOLIS – Ivy Tech Community College had the most successful fundraising effort among community college systems nationwide in 2014, according to a survey conducted by the Council for Aid to Education.

The 2014 Voluntary Support for Education (VSE) survey reported that Ivy Tech raised more than $23 million through Ivy Tech Foundation, the college’s fundraising arm, ranking it first among U.S. community college systems. The amount of raised money by Ivy Tech is more than double that of Broome Community College in New York, which is second on the list.

With an annual student enrollment of nearly 200,000, Ivy Tech is able to draw from a large body of distinguished alumni and high profile donors who recognize Ivy Tech’s impact on Indiana’s economy, workforce and community.  Ivy Tech was also ranked first among community colleges in 2013.

Through the years, the Foundation has provided more than $100 million in support. The money raised provides support for Ivy Tech students, faculty and staff, including student scholarships, as well as support for College programs, activities and needs.

“We are grateful and humbled by the efforts our donors have made this last year. In these economic times, donations are what allow Ivy Tech Community College to continue to serve Indiana and change the lives of Hoosiers,” said Thomas J. Snyder, President of Ivy Tech Community College.

“The support provided by our donors is an investment in our students and our state,” said Ivy Tech Foundation Board Chairman David Findlay. “This recognition is a wonderful outcome of our recent success, and we’ll continue to pursue our ambitious initiatives and goals as we begin a new fiscal year.”

The Voluntary Support for Education survey is the authoritative national source of information on private giving to higher education and private K-12 schools. The survey was submitted by nearly 1,500 institutions.

You can learn how donations benefit Ivy Tech and contribute yourself at www.ivytech.edu/giving/.

Ivy Tech Community College is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

The Sky’s The Limit

Graduate Satya Sunkavalli’s career is cleared for takeoff

satyaWhen you work in aviation, you know getting a flight from its point of origin to a destination isn’t always easy, and obstacles are the norm, not a rarity. What matters most is how well prepared you are to respond to those obstacles.

Maybe that’s why Satya Sunkavalli is such a great fit for the industry. Her journey toward a degree hasn’t always been easy, but now she’s ready to take flight.

Sunkavalli, a native of India, came to the United States on a student
visa in late 2010 with the intent to earn a pilot certification. She enrolled in a flight program at another institution in Indiana, but personal obstacles prevented her from completing her studies. She transferred to a comparable flight program in Florida with the hope of finishing, but despite a solid performance on the verbal portion of her test, she did not pass the flight portion.

“I was so discouraged and disappointed with myself,” Sunkavalli says. “But there are always challenges in life. You just can’t give up. Doing something a little different after this was a great way to regain my confidence.”

With that renewed spirit, she placed her pilot-training goal on hold and enrolled at Ivy Tech Community College to study aviation from a mechanical perspective.

Aviation Maintenance Technology instructor Brad Stark has taught Sunkavalli in four of his classes, with course content ranging from aircraft fuel systems to sheet metal fabrication.

“Satya strives to do her best at everything she does, and she tries to help the other students,” Stark says.

Sunkavalli’s achievements go beyond the classroom. She’s an advisor for the Aviation Explorer Post 2035 and the Experimental Aircraft Association’s Young Eagles Youth Program, both based at Smith Field in Fort Wayne. Sunkavalli also takes pride in her association with the local chapter of The Ninety-Nines, an international organization of women pilots founded by 99 licensed women pilots in 1929. Aviation icon Amelia Earhart served as the group’s first president. And most recently she was named a 2015 Newman Civic Fellow, an honor given to inspiring college student leaders who demonstrate an investment in finding solutions for challenges in their community.

Sunkavalli says she wants to become a certified pilot and also be among the first to apply for work at GE Aviation’s new $100 million, nextgeneration jet engine assembly facility being built in Lafayette, Ind. Now that she has her degree, she’s cleared for takeoff.

“Working at a global company like GE would be a great networking opportunity and help me stay on course with aviation and everything I’m looking for in my career,” Sunkavalli says.

Ivy Tech’s Associate Accelerated Degree Program (ASAP) achieves one of the highest graduation rates in the nation amongst first-generation college students

 

INDIANAPOLIS – Ivy Tech Community College’s nationally-recognized Associate Accelerated Program (known as ASAP) has achieved a 66 percent graduation rate, one of the highest graduation rates in the nation amongst at-risk, first-generation college students who are at a greater risk of not completing a college degree.  Retention rates for students participating in the program are 90 percent, which is nearly double that of Ivy Tech students outside the program.

Ivy Tech’s Associate Accelerated Program provides at-risk high school students facing life and family issues that prevent them from completing a degree, the opportunity to earn a marketable and transferable associate degree on a full-time basis in just eleven months.  Most students who are chosen for the program are identified while still in high school and are the first in their families to attend college.

Depending on the student’s eligibility, most ASAP students are able to complete the associate degree program for free or at little cost.

The students attend school full time, almost 40 hours a week, which allows them to graduate in a year. A traditional Ivy Tech student may take two or more years to complete the same degree.  The program is one of the many initiatives the college has implemented to help fulfil the Indiana Commission for Higher Education’s “15 to Finish” Initiative, focused on encouraging more students to attend college on a full-time basis.

“This program is a great example of how we are helping our students persist and graduate at Ivy Tech,” said President Thomas J. Snyder. “Through ASAP, Ivy Tech is able to help students who may not otherwise attend college and provide them with a solid foundation and head start to their next step, whether that is a transfer route to a bachelor’s degree or a career.”

The ASAP program was launched in the Fall of 2010 at two campuses and is expanding to all Ivy Tech campuses this year.  Lumina Foundation funded the expansion with a grant of more than $2.2 million in 2013, when the program was just offered at four campuses. Lumina provided the additional funding after the first three years of the program showed high success rates.

Since ASAP’s inception, the program has enrolled 441 students with another 173 students enrolled for the 2015-16 school year.

Through ASAP, students can get a degree in Liberal Arts, Business Administration or Education. ASAP prepares students to graduate and enter the workforce immediately or transfer to a four year institution.

The program provides wraparound support with dedicated program mentors. Students attend as a group, which allows them to form a learning community and provide peer support for each other. ASAP also incorporates service learning, allowing students to give back to the community outside the classroom.

Ivy Tech Community College is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its communities. In addition, its courses and programs transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and is a member of the North Central Association.